Exit Rain, Enter Weeds: June Gardening Tasks

As I look out at our Winterbloom landscape, I see abundant growth, color and wildlife activity, especially birds. I think the same Robin comes each spring to build a nest in the tree visible from our office window. Well, enough bird watching. Here are some June tasks for you:

  • This is the best month to plant the warm season annuals of flowers or vegetables: Eggplant, Tomato, Peppers, Corn, Basil, melons etc.
  • Mow regularly; set your lawn mower at the highest setting that you want for the rest of the summer until October. The longer grass helps to shade the roots and keeps the grass greener and healthier.
  • Keep up on the weeds. The rainy season is over and it will soon not be so much work.
  • Water as needed, one inch per week at least on the lawn, and about half an inch on the shrubs, is a standard rule of thumb.
  • Slug bait is still important to put out. Try to use safe pet bait.
  • Prune flowering shrubs or perennials after they bloom, as needed.
  • Check the leaves of your Rhodies and Azaleas to see if you need to do any weevil control such as nematodes or insect tape. If you see notches chewed out of the foliage, these pests have been there.
  • Also, check to see if you have lace bug damage on the leaves. It usually shows up later in the summer. They suck the Chlorophyll out of the leaf cells and make the leaves look hideous. They can be somewhat controlled by a predator called Green or Brown Lace Wings, which can be purchased locally.
  • If you want to make your Rhodies bloom more and look neater, it is time to dead head them.
  • Continue to take care of coddling moths and scab on apples and pears. Check to see how many times and how often.
  • It is time to thin out the fruits on pears and apples.
  • Spray for fruit flies on cherries.
  • Check for Aphids and cabbage worms and take action if needed on veggies or roses.

 

Around Winterbloom

This moment of peace is courtesy of Winterbloom and the European ground orchid

The Dactylorhiza maculata, or European ground orchid, requires relatively little care and adds a delicate touch of color and verticality to our planting beds.

Give them a half-day of sun and they’ll grow in, through and around your other plants.

They like our Willamette Valley climate of wet winters and dry summers, so consider giving them a try!

 

 

Brew Pub for Slugs?

Salt is good for killing slugs on the patio or sidewalk, but it kills plants in the garden. Some of our clients have used beer for their planting beds. Don’t waste the good stuff on them, though; buy the cheapest rot-gut you can find and pour it into shallow plastic tops or jar lids.  You should see results (we’ll leave it to your imagination what that means) by the next morning.

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