Tag Archives: Hesperaloe parviflora

Late Summer in Oregon Means Keep Watering

As I write this the news of the day is the historical total solar eclipse. Here in Tigard, we’re experiencing more than 99% of totality for two minutes.

Lacking most of the sunlight for two minutes won’t stunt the growth of your plantings, for sure, but lack of rainfall during this time of the year definitely could. it is particularly important to water your potted plants every day. They dry out much more quickly than your “grounded” flora.

Our vegetable garden loves all this heat and we’ve been harvesting. This year, we are growing tomatoes, broccoli, cucumbers, asparagus, rhubarb, golden berries, goji berries, figs, raspberries and herbs.

The biochar that we’ve been using along with natural fertilizers has caused our garden to really produce. We are very happy with the results.

Here I am about to spread some biochar on the rhubarb

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other late August gardening chores

  • Yes, keep weeding.
  • Mow regularly.
  • Don’t forget to water. The best time to water is in the early morning using approximately one inch a week on the lawn. Use more if it has been really hot and dry. Beds need half that much.
  • Monitor veggie garden irrigation closely so crops do not dry out.
  • Fertilize cucumbers, summer squash, and broccoli, while harvesting to maintain production. Harvest vegetables when edible to stimulate further production.
  • Control caterpillars on leafy vegetables or geraniums and petunias, as needed, with Bacillus Thuringiensis (BT). It is a natural product
  • Use mulch to protect ornamentals and garden plants from hot weather damage. For spider mite control on some ornamentals, hose off foliage once a day for three days once a month. Arborvitae hedges are the most susceptible.
  • You may want to control fleas in lawns with spray this month if you have outdoor pets.Well, speaking of heat and lack of rain, here are a few plants that actually like such conditions: Crape Myrtle (a China native), Pomegranates (thought to have originated in Iran) and Hesperaloe parviflora (native to the Southwest). Pomegranates grow well here, where they can bake, but they don’t produce fruit. They do produce orange flowers, and bright yellow foliage in the fall.

Around Winterbloom:

Well, speaking of heat and lack of rain, here are a few plants that actually like such conditions: Crape Myrtle (a China native), Pomegranates (thought to have originated in Iran) and Hesperaloe parviflora (native to the Southwest).

The Crape Myrtle tree has amazing bark, most commonly bright pink. Its blossoms usually burst forth in late August or September. The leaves turn to orange yellow flame in the fall. Crapes hate shade during the growing season.

Pomegranates grow well here, where they can bake, but they don’t produce fruit. They do produce orange flowers, and bright yellow foliage in the fall.

 

 

Please enjoy this glimpse of our Hesperaloe parviflora. It thrives during our dry Oregon summers, tempting hummingbirds with wands of coral blooms and pleasing our eyes with evergreen foliage.